MarieTrout

Walking through the blues.

In a rapidly changing world, the blues invites us to connect. It is like a good friend that doesn’t let you down. Whether we turn the car radio to a blues station, put on an album by a favorite artist, or go out to hear a blues band live, the blues is comforting and always accessible. It allows us to connect to ourselves, each other, to those who came before, and to restorative forays into the experiential. The blues doesn’t inspire revolution or protest. It helps us find our equilibrium when the world turns upside down. The blues helps us find cohesion. Artists build continuing blues traditions cumulatively on styles from the past, adapting them through imitation until they eventually claim new blues expressions as their own by merging influences with inspiration.

Befriending the blues invites us to be real and show up as we are. Many blues boomers feel disengaged with—and disconnected from—a world around them that they perceive as filled with phoniness, misunderstood political correctness, superficiality, disingenuousness, and diffuse power structures. For them, blues music serves as an antidote, providing something real, in an environment that is unproblematic, safe, enjoyable and fun. Blues music connects the dots between an inner, often opaque universe of sensations, and an outer shared experience. Engagement and empathy are possible when blues fans feel safe enough to connect with others. The blues is such a safe place. In the 21st century, blues music thus plays a powerful role in the lives of its fans, although the makeup of its core audience has changed.

Read the entire Summary Chapter here: http://bit.ly/2eGxdzt]

Mark Pucci Media

MARIE TROUT, PhD – AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY

Huntington Beach, CA

For almost a quarter century working in the music industry, Marie wondered what it is that happens to perfectly ordinary people when attending blues concerts. Emotions drift across faces like migratory clouds moving across a sunny sky, toes tap and bodies start to sway. Looking at blues audiences from the stage, is to bear witness to displays of ever-changing life-affirming panhuman expressions of elation, joy, wonder, release, vulnerability, immersion, sadness and grief. When lost in blues music, the straight-faced watchfulness, otherwise customary in social situations, lessens. Marie muses:

– I have always been curious in how music, and particularly blues music, somehow transforms us in subtle, but pervasive ways: how it can lift moods and just make us feel comforted: enveloped, interconnected, and that it is OK to just be.

It was natural for her, therefore, to use this curiosity as driving force in approaching her PhD research: She embarked on a Grounded Theory study of what contemporary (mainly white and middle-aged) blues fans get out of their love affair with the genre today. Combined academic findings highlighted and illustrated by story-telling find expression in her book: The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good.

Born in Århus, Denmark in 1962, growing up Marie often felt alone and that she was “a bit of a strange bird.” She decided early on that instead of trying to fit in, she would rather fight to figure things out on her own terms. She wanted to be an author, but couldn’t figure out how.

Torn between interest in psychology and love of learning, she settled on a BA in Education, which she completed in 1989. During her studies, she managed a night club, did band PR, and owned and operated an advertising sales company. By the end of 1990 (with friends and family questioning her judgment), she packed up and left her business to follow her heart. She was in love, and moved to Southern California with Walter Trout: an internationally touring (but penniless) blues rock guitarist, singer, song-writer, who had recently gone solo after a steady career as a sideman with five years each in Canned Heat and John Mayall’s band, the Bluesbreakers.

Shortly after landing on American soil, Marie started working as part of Walter’s touring crew, a position that gave her access to business elements of Walter’s career. Although he had a Top Ten hit in the Netherlands and was voted the sixth best guitarist in BBC’s 1993 Listener’s Poll, financial success did not follow the accolades. Marie gradually discovered that there were many irregularities with regard to management of Walter’s business, explaining why financial success seemed far off. Eventually, she had collected enough evidence: Walter was being robbed blind by people he trusted to run his business affairs for him.

After Walter and Marie’s first child was born in 1993, Marie took over as Walter’s manager, a position she still fills today. In 1996, after giving birth to their second son, she also took over as Walter’s agent in Europe. A third son followed in 2001. Marie enjoyed being active in business, but also being able to bring the children on tour, and at other times work from her home office providing continuity when Walter was on the road, and the children needed to be in school.

In 2012, she completed her MA along with being certified in Life Coaching. In 2015, she completed her PhD in Wisdom Studies, which allowed many components of Marie’s work, observations, and professional pursuits to come together. She credits her Major Advisor, Mark Ryan, a 20-year Dean at Yale University with providing structure and encouragement to finish her studies when her life fell apart in 2013. Walter was diagnosed with end-stage liver disease.

In 2014, Walter came close to death repeatedly. In a desperate, last-ditch effort to improve odds of Walter receiving a liver transplant Marie brought Walter to Nebraska for six months, leaving two still-at-home middle-and high school children with a caregiver in California. A steady support from Walter’s fans made the move financially (and emotionally) possible, and Marie is adamant that his survival was a community effort. During Walter’s illness, and after he recovered, she has advocated organ donation, appearing on several radio as well as TV news and talk-shows. This commitment continues in support of Donate Life campaigns, and Walter and Marie jointly serve as protectors for the Danish organization, Organdonation – Ja Tak.

Marie and Walter are determined to give back. All proceeds from The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good, will benefit the HART fund, which helps provide medical care for musicians facing a broad range of health concerns. Marie is no stranger to uncertainty, pain, and worry:

– I know what it is like to live the blues. Nobody is immune to suffering no matter how much they seek to insure and protect themselves. Like lightning from clear sky, our lives change and we are powerless to change it back. Nobody can avoid hardship and pain, but we can dare to reach out, and walk through it together with those who respond. I have walked through my blues for now and am constantly reminded to take nothing for granted. When I look around our world, I realize that by comparison, Walter and I have been fortunate. Walter is once again healthy and on the road with his awesome band, and I am once again busy managing his career. With a book coming out, and another one brewing in my head, I feel connected to, and in tune with, my life’s purpose. I am grateful.


Mark Pucci Media

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 22, 2016
Contact: Karin Johnson (770) 804-9555 / karin@markpuccimedia.com

A Matinee with Author Marie Trout: Why Blues Matters in the 21st Century

Harris Center for the Arts, March 11, 2017 at 6:30 PM

All Book Sale Proceeds Benefit the HART Fund

Prior to the March 11 8PM show at the Harris Center for the Arts with blues rock guitarist extraordinaire, Walter Trout, there will be a chance to meet and talk with author Marie B. Trout, PhD, his wife and manager, who will give a brief 20 minute presentation and outline of her newly released book: The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good. The event starts at 6:30 PM, is free and open to the public, and the book will be available for purchase.

Marie knows the blues from her studies. She has also lived with the blues when her husband narrowly escaped death, and was saved in the 11th hour by a liver transplant. Now, two years after Walter’s astounding recovery, her original academic research of blues fans has combined with professional and personal experience. The result is a testament to the enduring power of the music – also in the 21st century.

Today’s blues fans (who are primarily white baby boomers) express en masse that they are encouraged, strengthened, and—yes find healing—through their love of blues music, because it is raw, transparent, honest, and “real.” They simultaneously express their frustration with a culture that is not. In providing context for these findings, Marie explores what historically readied this generation particularly for blues music and its subtle mood-enhancing, cathartic qualities.

She will talk about how blues is uniquely powerful at expressing paradoxical emotional realities that are difficult to put into words. Involvement with blues offers respite from a mindset has left an entire generation as emotional refugees, feeling that they work hard, follow the rules for engagement professionally and privately, and still often “can’t get no satisfaction.”

To arrange an interview with Marie Trout, contact: Karin Johnson at Mark Pucci Media
(770) 804-9555 / karin@markpuccimedia.com

Marie Trout Hi-Res Photo Download (credit – Denise Truscello):
http://www.markpuccimedia.com/Marie-Trout-by-Denise-Truscello.jpg

The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good is now available for sale in paperback as well as Kindle/eBook on Amazon.com.

Matinee with Marie Trout at Harris Center- 6:30 PM March 11, 2017

To ensure a seat at the Marie Trout matinee discussion, please do the following:

  • Email Jan Kelley with the Sacramento Blues Society with your name and number of people in your party (# of seats): bobsled@winfirst.com;
  • You will be placed on a will-call list for check-in at the door of the “Scott-Skillman Stage 3” inside Harris Center – across from Stage 1.
  • If you have a ticket to see Walter Trout at 8P (GREAT!)- but you still need to RSVP for this matinee to secure your seat(s) – 95 seat capacity.
  • Didn’t buy tickets to Walter Trout but now would like to? Tickets at www.harriscenter.net while they last!
  • Matinee begins promptly at 6:30 P, give yourself time to park, check-in and grab your seat. If for some reason you need to cancel, please contact Jan so she can allow someone else to attend.

Thank you


Mark Pucci Media

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 3, 2016
Contact: Mark Pucci (770) 804-9555 / mpmedia@bellsouth.net

Author Marie Trout’s New Book, The Blues – Why it still Hurts so Good, Set for February 3, 2017 Publication, Explores the Healing Power of Music

All Book Sale Proceeds Benefit the HART Fund

Huntington Beach, CA – Author Marie B. Trout, PhD, wife and manager of blues guitarist extraordinaire, Walter Trout, knows the blues. She has also lived with the blues when her husband narrowly escaped death, and was saved in the 11th hour by a liver transplant. Now, two years after Walter’s astounding recovery, her original academic research of blues fans has congealed with professional and personal experience into a book about the role of blues music to modern audiences, its impact, and enduring power: The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good.

Based on a Grounded Theory research study of blues fans, musicians and industry people, the book is scheduled for publication on February 3, 2017. To celebrate its release, Marie will appear that same day at a panel on the healing power of the blues (moderated by blues scholar and author Don Wilcock) during the upcoming International Blues Challenge in Memphis, as well as a pre-release party onboard the Rhythm & Blues Cruise in late January.

All proceeds from the sale of The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good will benefit the HART Fund, established by The Blues Foundation for blues musicians and their families in financial need due to a broad range of health concerns. The fund provides acute, chronic and preventive medical and dental care as well as funeral and burial expenses.

Advance rave reviews of the new book are already pouring in from musicians and authors:

“What a monumental discourse into the mysteries and pleasures of the blues and a wonderful addition to one’s library.”
– John Mayall, “The Godfather of British Blues,” Blues Hall of Fame inductee

“Incredible research unearthing things I never knew! Totally captivating.”
– Jim Gaines, multi-Grammy winning producer/engineer Santana, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Lee Hooker

“This book is wildly, incredibly brilliant. I never knew why I loved the Blues – and now I do. What a fabulous read.”
– Caroline Myss, New York Times bestselling author of Anatomy of the Spirit

Click HERE to read further endorsements/reactions to the book.

After surveying over a thousand blues fans and interviewing fans, industry professionals, and musicians, Marie Trout found that to its current audience, blues music acts as a good friend that “has your back and doesn’t let you down.” In 2013 and ’14, while working on her dissertation, Marie took care of her, then, gravely ill husband, blues rock musician, Walter Trout. She reflects:

– I noticed that my academic research and my inner torment at the time intersected. I lived the blues, while studying the power of blues music to its fans today.

In a gut-wrenching and expensive last-ditch effort, Marie moved 1,600 miles away from their Southern California home literally carrying her deathly ill soul mate onboard the plane in order to improve odds of him getting a life-saving liver transplant. They left two teenage sons behind with a caregiver for six months spent in the hospital in Omaha, Nebraska, fighting for Walter’s life.

Marie discovered that emotional pain, her blues, somehow lessened by blogging about it:

– The blues community, our friends and family saved Walter’s life and my sanity by offering support, love, and kindness. This community made me feel that I was not alone as I faced constant worry, financial devastation, and endless uncertainty. At my lowest point, and with great fear of being ridiculed and rejected, I sent my anguish out to the world asking for help in a fundraiser and an accompanying blog. That day something changed: I discovered the gift of sharing authentically; I was no longer alone in my emotional prison. When others read it, responded, and shared their own stories, I realized that this connection in many ways was similar to what blues fans expressed in my research. They felt connected and safe to be themselves when listening to blues music: they felt part of a soul-community.

The notion that human beings bond and find resonance with one another when they hear someone “tell it like it is,” was indeed a primary finding in her studies of blues music fans today. After Walter recovered, Marie decided that this role of blues music to contemporary audiences, along with its transformative musical potential, and many other findings emerging in her research, had not been previously explored sufficiently in literature.

Today’s blues fans (who are primarily white baby boomers) express en masse that they are encouraged, strengthened, and—yes find healing—through their love of blues music, because it is raw, transparent, honest, and “real.” They simultaneously express their frustration with a culture that is not. In providing context for these findings, Marie explores what historically readied this generation particularly for blues music and its subtle mood-enhancing, cathartic qualities.

The book further highlights how blues is uniquely powerful at expressing paradoxical emotional realities that its primary audience of baby boomers otherwise often chooses to hide. Involvement with blues offers respite from a mindset has left an entire generation as emotional refugees, feeling that they work hard, follow the rules for engagement professionally and privately, and still often “can’t get no satisfaction.” Marie Trout writes:

– Blues interaction offers another way of relating in which non-competitive qualities are front and center. Instead of “nail the test, perform, perfect, pretend” – the message is “be yourself, be authentic, connect.”

Showing how blues today still is a universal gift from the base of humanity providing antidote to fast-paced, fragmented, and often superficial popular culture is a story that Marie wishes to tell as another way of honoring the legacy of blues originators.

Walter is now completely cured. He is once again touring the US and internationally with his band, and Marie will donate all proceeds from The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good to the HART Fund, serving musicians without health insurance.

– It is important for Walter and I to give back to the community that literally and figuratively bought stock in Walter’s liver. And to help musicians in need of help, is just passing on what we received. I hope many will find that the book gives them a new appreciation for, and understanding of, blues music. And simultaneously that the funds raised will be a blessing to those who are ill and are currently living the blues.

To arrange an interview with Marie Trout, contact: Mark Pucci Media (770) 804-9555 / mpmedia@bellsouth.net.

Click HERE to read a sample chapter of The Blues – Why it still Hurts so Good.

Photo Credit: Denise Truscello

Photos of Dr. Marie Trout

  • Photo Credit: Brittany Fay Photography

  • Photo Credit: Brittany Fay Photography

  • Photo Credit: Brittany Fay Photography

  • Photo Credit: Denise Truscello

  • Photo Credit: Greg Waterman

Book Covers

  • BOOK COVER (Print Quality)

  • BOOK COVER (Online Quality)

“Many of the things that I read in Dr. Trout’s book made me nod my head in agreement, but there were others that had never occurred to me, even considering the thought I had put into it over time. I really enjoyed how she combined the academic aspects of the study with the personal reflections from fans, artists, and even the Trouts’ own perspective. This is a very interesting and revealing book that will be of interest to any blues fan who has wondered why they’re drawn to this music.”
– Graham Clarke, Blues Bytes

“This is a must read for anyone wanting to know what to say to the friend or relative who asks why are you listening to all that sad music?”
– Don Wilcock, Blues Music Magazine

“This is a remarkable body of research that delivers some very unique explanations of why the blues resonates. Even those of us who have been blues fans throughout our lives can learn much through Marie’s work.”
– Jim Hynes, Elmore Magazine

“Like many of you, I’ve often wondered why the blues has had such a broad appeal to so many people from every demographic over so many generations. It touches and speaks like no other genre and has influenced in incalculable ways. Finally, there’s an excellent, well researched, intelligently written book that goes a long way in helping us know the answers to this.”
– Randy Patterson, Boomerocity.com

“Although the therapeutic value of music has not been wholly certified in scientific terms, it is nevertheless an accepted premise in our culture, one that Marie Trout explores with as much passion as scholarship in her book The Blues: Why It Still Hurts So Good. By homing in on a specific genre as her focal point, she’s able to credibly illuminate the various themes of that aforementioned premise in such a way her readers will believe as deeply in it as she does by the time they’re done reading.”
– Doug Collette, All About Jazz

“Marie Trout puts both sides of her life and work into her pen for The Blues, Why It Still Hurts So Good. Though the book comes from the psychological side of The Blues, the words come from a musical heart rather than an academic brain.”
The Alternate Root

“There is much to admire in Dr. Trout’s work. Not the least of which is the ample size of her inquiry. She interviewed more than one thousand blues fans, performers, and industry insiders. There must be something about the blues that invites people to let their guard down; many of those questioned were exceedingly forthcoming with their descriptions of how the music fills needs sometimes left empty in contemporary society. In the end, Dr. Trout paints a portrait of the blues as being one of the most malleable and useful forms of art out there.”
– Greg Victor, Parcbench.live

“As a long-time fan of blues music, I instinctively “get” that “Sweet Home Chicago,” “The Thrill is Gone,” and “Dust My Broom” move me. When Eric Clapton and Robbie Robertson were trading leads on “Further On Up the Road” in Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz, I knew that Bobby “Blue” Bland’s classic blues song transcended geographic, racial and emotional boundaries when I first saw that documentary film in the 1970s. This book does an exceptional job of exploring deep and personal connections between blues music and its fans.”
– Eric Steiner, Washington Blues Society

“I promise to purchase two additional copies of this book. One I will send to my older brother (by four years) and the other copy to my younger sister (by four years). If they read this book they may better understand me.”
– Richard Ludmerer, Making a Scene

“It was a miraculous thing when guitar wizard Walter Trout stared death in the eyes and won. Now his wife Marie has written a new book about the healing power of music called The Blues – Why it Still Hurts So Good. The book will be out on Feb. 3 and all proceeds will benefit the Blues Foundation’s wonderful Hart Fund. Mrs. Trout has a PhD and based the book on a Grounded Theory research study of blues fans, musicians and industry professionals. She found that beyond providing musical entertainment to its current audience, the blues acts as a good friend that “has your back and doesn’t let you down.” Don’t we know that to be true?”
– Karen Murphy, Chicago Blues News

“Author Marie B. Trout, PhD, wife and manager of blues rock guitarist extraordinaire, Walter Trout, knows the blues. She has also lived with the blues when her husband narrowly escaped death, and was saved in the 11th hour by a liver transplant. Now, two years after Walter’s astounding recovery, her original academic research of blues fans has congealed with professional and personal experience into a book about the role of blues music to modern audiences, its impact, and enduring power.”
Blues Festival Guide

“The title of the book, The Blues, Why It Hurts So Good, promises the reader a perspective on the blues genre that breaks the chains of the mantra “Keeping the blues alive.” There is a subliminal suggestion in that oft quoted catch phrase that suggests blues is an anachronism whose very existence as a contemporary theme song for our lives is in jeopardy. Dr. Marie Trout trounces that suggestion and makes the slogan instantly passé. She not only makes good on proving the validity of her title, she also shatters more than one glass ceiling in the process and gives the fan base the promise of a bright future.”
– Don Wilcock, Blues Blast Magazine

“For an in-depth examination of the blues and blues fans in the present day, The Blues – Why it Still Hurts so Good is an informative must read.”
– Barry Kerzner, American Blues Scene

“Dr. Trout combines her own experience and the words of fans,, musicians and industry professionals to look at the blues in a most professional, unusual and interesting way.”
– Rhetta Akamatsu, BlogCritics.org

“What a monumental discourse into the mysteries and pleasures of the blues and a wonderful addition to one’s library.”
– John Mayall, “the Godfather of British Blues,” Blues Hall of Fame inductee

“Incredible research unearthing things I never knew! Totally captivating.”
– Jim Gaines, multi-Grammy winning producer/engineer Santana, Stevie Ray Vaughan, John Lee Hooker

“This book is wildly, incredibly brilliant. I never knew why I loved the blues – and now I do. What a fabulous read.”
– Caroline Myss, New York Times bestselling author of Anatomy of the Spirit

“As a veteran blues journalist with 5000 interviews under my belt, I’ve struggled for decades to understand what makes musicians find bliss in their obsession with documenting catharsis and improvising the results for thousands of people. Through an academic study, Dr. Trout connects the dots, pulls together the threads, and validates what I’ve been trying to prove forever: that blues is America’s cultural gift to the world.”
– Donald E. Wilcock, blues scholar, author of Damn Right I Got The Blues- Buddy Guy and the Blues Roots of Rock-and-Roll

“For a true appreciation of the enduring power of the blues, Dr. Marie Trout cleverly highlights the connection between music and consciousness in a way that breaks new ground.”
– Bruce D Schneider, PhD, author of Energy Leadership, founder of iPEC Coaching

“Marie Trout has done something quite unique. Many can write about the business of the blues, but not many can speak personally about the tribulations along the way. Although she may not play or sing blues for a living, there’s no question about her personal contact with the blues. I recommend you read this unique perspective.”
– Joe Louis Walker, Grammy Award winning blues musician, Blues Hall of Fame inductee

“Marie Trout’s, THE BLUES, is a fascinating work of social history about fans of blues music. Her insightful analysis also sheds new light on events in the broader society and her findings will be of great interest to sociologists and social psychologists.”
– Raymond Moody MD, PhD, world-renowned scholar and researcher, award-winning author of Life After Life

“From where the blues came to where the blues are going, a fascinating journey of a universal genre. Wonderfully written and totally relevant.”
– Sandy Carrol, Memphis-based contemporary blues singer/songwriter

“Standing on deep inquiry, this book is a landmark… a must read for anyone with even a passing interest in the blues. Phenomenal.”
– Stephen Dale Petit, Musician, New Blues Ambassador and writer

“The Blues – Why It Still Hurts So Good is a breathtakingly complex and beautiful exploration of a musical genre that embodies powerful healing potential for the world. In part, because through Trout’s study of current blues fans, she demonstrates how blues contains a universal language capable of expressing our shared experience and connectedness. The Blues is both groundbreaking and paradigm-shifting in its complexity! She employs a lens that ranges from blues history and blues legends to blues wisdom and the neuroscience of feelings, and how we are affected by a genre that insists on “telling it like it is!” A truly extraordinary musical journey and an important historical, intellectual, and creative contribution to an important genre.”
– Belvie Rooks, essayist, educator, and producer

“While there are many good blues artist biographies, we have lacked a concise empirical study of why so many people love the blues. Until now. Marie Trout’s groundbreaking book fills that sorely missing gap, and does so in an enlightening and entertaining manner. This is an important book, and an enjoyable read. Anyone who wonders why so many people love the blues, will not only want to own, but to share Marie Trout’s The Blues.
– Jesse Finkelstein, author, attorney at law, and broadcaster of Blues Radio International

“In her book, The Blues – Why It Still Hurts So Good, Marie Trout adeptly explains to the reader how the music of the blues captivates and then emotionally impacts the listener. Her work is grounded in academic research yet accessible to all, and her theses are made even more impactful by the manner in which she weaves her personal story, as well as that of other blues fans, artists, and professionals, into the narrative. This book is the perfect read for the blues lover who wants to better understand his or her own connection to the music. But I would also strongly recommend it to the music fan who is confused by the passion with which blues lovers are drawn to this specific genre. If each of us could connect to the stirring power of the blues of which she speaks, perhaps we might better identify with each other, or even more, connect with our inner selves to find that peace and healing which we ultimately seek.”
– Barbara B. Newman, President and CEO of the Blues Foundation

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"We are more alike than we are different. This is the story of the blues."

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